noswagsoever

noswagsoever:

the-goddamazon:

flawlessindie:

Belle (2013) dir. Amma Asante

I don’t think you guys know just how powerful this scene was. Literally when I was in the audience I could just see a lot of the women of color affected by this scene. A lot of us have gone through this self denial and self hate through the effects of white beauty standards and beliefs forced down our throats.This was the first time I had ever seen something that I had personally felt before portrayed on the screen and it put tears in my eyes.  If you haven’t seen this movie, go see it. It’s out on dvd/bluray/streaming

Oh my God I need to see this movie. I have gone through this scene exactly, down to trying to rub the color out of my skin in self-loathing.

Ah god.

Me in middle school AFTER I learned what racism was..

medievalpoc
medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

blackourstory
afriblaq:

Mary Turner 1918 Eight Months Pregnant Mobs lynched Mary Turner on May 17, 1918 in Lowndes County, Georgia because she vowed to have those responsible for killing her husband arrested. Her husband was arrested in connection with the shooting and killing Hampton Smith, a white farmer for whom the couple had worked, and for wounding his wife. Sidney Johnson. a Black man, apparently killed Smith because he was tired of the farmer’s abuse. Unable to find Johnson. the killers lynched eight other Blacks Including Hayes Turner and his wife Mary. The mob hanged Mary by her feet, poured gasoline and oil on her and set fire to her body. One white man sliced her open and Mrs. Turner’s baby tumbled to the ground with a “little cry” and the mob stomped the baby to death and sprayed bullets into Mary Turner. (NAACP: Thirty Years of Lynching in the U.S. 1889-1918 )

I thought her name was Laura Nelson?

afriblaq:

Mary Turner 1918 Eight Months Pregnant
Mobs lynched Mary Turner on May 17, 1918 in Lowndes County, Georgia because she vowed to have those responsible for killing her husband arrested. Her husband was arrested in connection with the shooting and killing Hampton Smith, a white farmer for whom the couple had worked, and for wounding his wife. Sidney Johnson. a Black man, apparently killed Smith because he was tired of the farmer’s abuse. Unable to find Johnson. the killers lynched eight other Blacks Including Hayes Turner and his wife Mary. The mob hanged Mary by her feet, poured gasoline and oil on her and set fire to her body. One white man sliced her open and Mrs. Turner’s baby tumbled to the ground with a “little cry” and the mob stomped the baby to death and sprayed bullets into Mary Turner. (NAACP: Thirty Years of Lynching in the U.S. 1889-1918 )

I thought her name was Laura Nelson?

classicladiesofcolor
cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Judith Jamison
'Judith Jamison joined Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1965 and quickly became an international star. Over the next 15 years, Mr. Ailey created some of his most enduring roles for her, most notably the tour-de-force solo Cry. During the 1970s and ‘80s, she appeared as a guest artist with ballet companies all over the world, starred in the hit Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies, and formed her own company, The Jamison Project. She returned to Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1989 when Mr. Ailey asked her to succeed him as Artistic Director. In the 21 years that followed, she brought the Company to unprecedented heights, including two historic engagements in South Africa and a 50-city global tour to celebrate the Company’s 50th anniversary.’ via AlvinAiley.org
(photo: Judith Jamison)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Judith Jamison

'Judith Jamison joined Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1965 and quickly became an international star. Over the next 15 years, Mr. Ailey created some of his most enduring roles for her, most notably the tour-de-force solo Cry. During the 1970s and ‘80s, she appeared as a guest artist with ballet companies all over the world, starred in the hit Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies, and formed her own company, The Jamison Project. She returned to Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1989 when Mr. Ailey asked her to succeed him as Artistic Director. In the 21 years that followed, she brought the Company to unprecedented heights, including two historic engagements in South Africa and a 50-city global tour to celebrate the Company’s 50th anniversary.’ via AlvinAiley.org

(photo: Judith Jamison)

- CARTER Magazine

owning-my-truth

atane:

I keep seeing white liberals on social media posting that they can’t believe what is happening in Ferguson, or that they can’t believe this is happening in America. Now I normally wouldn’t care enough about any of that to make any commentary, but they are sending me messages,

outraged at what America has become. This America is strange to them. “Are you seeing this?” Yes, I see it. “How is this happening?” Have you all not noticed that I’m Black? Do you genuinely believe that you are sharing confidential information here? Is white supremacy and the abuse of power by the police supposed to be breaking news for me? It’s like they’re saying “us good white people wanted to let you know that there are bad white people out there doing bad things. It’s shocking! Just want to let you know in case you weren’t aware.” They can’t believe it they say.

There are only 3 reasons why they can’t believe that Black people are under siege in the United States and those reasons are as follows;

1. They know nothing about the country they live in. Absolutely nothing.

2. They haven’t actually listened or payed attention to anything Black people have said before.

3. They are deep denial about their country.

This is a country that dropped two bombs via air on Black people in Philadelphia in 1985. When it comes to raids and sieges, all white people know is Waco and maybe Ruby Ridge. They don’t know about MOVE in Philadelphia. Go ask your white liberal friends if they know about MOVE and you will probably be met with blank stares.

Since the inception of the US as a settler nation, Black people have been under siege. Black people being under siege is something many white liberals cannot fathom because they have never been under siege and they don’t know Black history beyond Martin Luther King having a dream and Rosa Parks sitting on a bus. They are comparing Ferguson to war zones outside the US because this doesn’t seem like home. Certainly not the home they know. They can’t fathom it happening in their country. No my friends, this is America. This is your country. This is what it has always been. Violence committed against Black people is as American as apple pie.

This level of savagery is foreign to white liberals because they don’t encounter openly hostile and aggressive law enforcement as a default. They don’t have to deal with the indignity and dehumanization of barbaric policing and then get told that them being targeted for abuse is the law (i.e. stop and frisk, broken windows, Rockefeller drug laws etc). They’re not accosted by officers with K9 units. They’re not dealing with aerial outposts of police surveillance in their communities. It’s not their blood flowing on the streets. Pictures of dead white bodies murdered by the police and white vigilantes isn’t a reality that gets shared on social media. Their dead bodies aren’t used by opportunistic media outlets looking to garner traffic and clicks for profit. Their dead bodies aren’t consumed by an eager audience looking to take a bite out of the latest ‘strange fruit’ that fell off the poplar tree. Cops are not barging into their homes and destroying everything in sight. It’s not their naked grandmothers being dragged out of their homes. It’s certainly not their 7 year old daughters getting shot and murdered as they sleep like Aiyana Jones, nor is it their teenage sons being taken to remote marshes, forced to strip, beaten to a bloody pulp and then abandoned nude, like Rayshawn Moreno.

Do they think these cops became this aggressive, violent and militarized overnight? They evolved into the beasts you see by enacting brutality on Black people. Evolved is the wrong word here. They’ve always been like this. They just have better equipment at their disposal. Gone are the water cannons and fire hoses. They now have rubber and wooden bullets, tear gas and sound cannons that cause permanent hearing loss

The looting narrative is dead. Anti-Black racists can’t spin this with the classic Black criminality boogieman. The police are assaulting residential neighborhoods. The tide turned for white liberals after journalists started getting assaulted. Then it got real. It wasn’t real before when it was only Black bodies. Black suffering is meant for consumption and profit, not for enacting justice. Anti-Black racists wanted to conflate the issue with a handful of looters, as if the entire Black community in Ferguson were looters.

The question that should now be posed is that if journalists are getting arrested, physically assaulted, pelted with rubber and wooden bullets and even getting shot at with tear gas; if this is how the police is acting when everyone is watching, how do you think the police acts towards Black people when no one is watching? How do you think their policing in Black communities is conducted? Please note, after shooting journalists directly with tear gas, the police took their cameras. See here.

All this is happening in Ferguson because Black people dared to demand that the cop who murdered 18 year old Michael Brown be held accountable. They have to fight for mere accountability. Justice is not a given, they have to literally take to the streets and brave a police force that looks like an occupying military presence, complete with weaponry for warfare.

Ask yourselves white liberals, how often do white people have to galvanize entire communities and protest to get someone charged with murdering a white person? This is what Black people have to do time and time again.

Anyone who “can’t believe” what is happening in Ferguson is someone who is ahistorical and ignorant about the relationship the US has with Black people. We live in a country where the first air strikes delivered on US soil was on Black people in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Their communities were destroyed. Incendiary bombs and explosives were dropped on them by white law enforcement via World War I planes. I repeat, they dropped bombs on Black people in residential neighborhoods. I made no mention of the ground attacks, just the aerial assaults. So by all means, after you feign shock at what is happening in Ferguson, crack open a book (written by a Black historian) and see what your country has been doing and getting away with for time immemorial.

We are living through and watching Ferguson in real time, and this will be history. Like with previous sieges and assaults on Black communities, the grandchildren of today’s white liberals who know nothing about MOVE in Philly or Black Wall Street in Tulsa or Rosewood or the Colfax riot or the Wilmington insurrection or any of the numerous state sponsored and funded assaults on Black communities will feign shock and disbelief when Black people are again assaulted and they will say “I can’t believe this is happening in America”. These are the same white people who are outraged at wiretaps and declare that “the government is invading their privacy”. They will say “this country is turning into a police state”. They will say that when this country had the FBI’s Cointelpro. Surveillance is something that is shocking to them. It’s shocking because they don’t know about Cointelpro and what it did to Black people and Black progress. Black people have lived under siege and under surveillance. This might be new for you, but it’s not new for Black people.

In the future when the young Black protesters of today’s Ferguson will be old, the young white liberals, much like their forbears who have never heard of MOVE, will know nothing of Ferguson. White people have the privilege of not needing to know. Ferguson will be another ugly chapter in the annals of US history that will not be part of a school curriculum outside of a Black studies class.

Black people will soldier on. They are survivors. The very existence of Black people in the US and the Americas is a tale of survival. Bless them. Bless us.

- See more at: http://owning-my-truth.com/post/94865632807/i-cant-believe-this-is-happening-in-america#sthash.qoqS5G83.dpuf

What you didn’t know about the Fleur-de-Lis

Slaves who misbehaved in French New Orleans could expect harsh punishment. Crimes that could earn someone a few months in prison today were punishable by whipping or branding, even death. After a runaway slave was caught, he could be whipped with impunity by his captors, and then the court could sentence him to have an ear cut off and be branded with a fleur-de-lis. Slave policies in French Louisiana were officially set by the Black Code, first issued by the French crown in 1685 and revised in 1724. Much of the code is about slave punishment: how it should be carried out and the punishments appropriate for certain crimes.

The Code Noir and criminal procedure in French Louisiana

There has been much debate over the meaning of the Black Code and how it should be interpreted. According to Mathé Allain, the framers of the code thought of it as “a series of practical bureaucratic measures, intended to fit into an overall reorganization of French administration and to protect valuable property.” [1] Allain paints a picture of the Black Code not as motivated by humanitarian concerns, but practical ones. The punishments prescribed by the Code are often severe. A slave convicted of major theft was to receive the death penalty; petty theft, a flogging and branding. However, the Code also contains provisions preventing owners from mistreating or mutilating their slaves. Alain says that these “protections … simply aimed at preserving an expensive investment. … Brutal and cruel masters damaged valuable property, which … endangered an institution which, by 1685, was considered indispensable.” [2]

The Black Code established that slaves convicted of crimes were to be tried under the same procedure as whites.
“Standard criminal procedure consisted of the following steps: the master filed a complaint with the attorney general, who in turn, reported the alleged crime to the Superior Council and requested permission to interrogate the accused. Once permission was granted, the alleged criminal was conducted to the New Orleans prison, where he was interrogated by the king’s prosecutor, a councilor, a notary and at least two witnesses. Potential witnesses and/or principals whose testimony conflicted with that of the defendant, were “confronted” with the accused before the attorney general and each was given the opportunity to defend statements as well as to attack unfounded allegations. (As in white criminal cases, attorneys were banned from the courtroom.) These proceedings were usually quite lengthy, for cases involving as many as nine witnesses were not uncommon. Once the trial was concluded, however, the attorney general submitted the transcripts to the Superior Council with his recommendations for sentencing, and these recommendations were invariably implemented.” [3]

Punishments for Slaves

Brasseaux says that the decisions reached by the Council were “neither unusually harsh, nor inequitable,” and cites the case of Biron, a runaway slave who was accused of attempted murder as evidence. Witnesses revealed that Biron had only seized his master’s gun in order to keep himself from being shot, so instead of receiving the death penalty, the customary punishment for a slave assaulting a white person, he was merely publicly flogged, the penalty for marronage. [4] Thomas Ingersoll, writing for the Law and History Review, has a different view: the way the Code was actually enforced in Louisiana made its protection of slaves relatively weak. “While evidence is lacking that the protective measures of the Code Noir had much effect, proof is abundant that the repressive measures were applied: slaves could expect to suffer exemplary punishment in and out of court.” [5]

Numerous crimes could earn a slave a whipping, several could get one branded with a fleur de lis, and a surprising number of crimes warranted the death penalty. Article 12 of the 1724 Code prescribes whipping for slaves caught carrying weapons or heavy sticks. Article 13 says that slaves from different masters who were caught gathering in crowds should be whipped, and possibly branded with a fleur de lis, and even killed in extreme cases. Violence against their master or members of their master’s family earned a slave death, as could violence against any free person. Major theft could earn the death penalty, petty theft a whipping and branding with the fleur de lis. The Code’s most brutal penalties are reserved for runaway slaves: first offenders had their ears cut off and were branded with the fleur de lis on the shoulder, second offenders were hamstrung and branded on their other shoulder, and third offenders were killed.

While the days of elaborate torture chambers were more or less over by the 1700s, there was still quite a bit of specialized equipment used to punish slaves. Most common was the whip, administered in doses from just a few lashes to over 100, which would leave the victim’s back a bloody mess. Runaway slaves were made to wear heavy iron collars, often with long iron spikes, as shown in the picture at left. These made even basic movements difficult and inconvenient, and some slaves were forced to wear them for months at a time. Slaves were often shackled and chained. The brands used to mark runaway slaves with a fleur-de-lis or thieves with a “V” (voleur, French for “thief”) were not unlike the brands used to mark livestock for identification. Branding was a brutal punishment not just because of the great pain caused by the burn, but because it was a permanent and highly visible mark of one’s criminal past.

The whippings and hangings prescribed by the Code Noir didn’t end in the early 1700s. In an article published in the Daily Picayune on January 18, 1895, about Orleans Parish prison moving locations, the author claims that severe punishments were still carried out well into the 1800s.

Links

Louisiana’s Code Noir

* Allain, M. (1980). Slave Policies in French Louisiana. Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association, 21(2), 127-137.

  • Allain, 1980.
  • Brasseaux, C. A. (1980). The Administration of Slave Regulations in French Louisiana, 1724-1766. Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association, 21(2), 139-158.
  • Brasseaux, 1980.
  • Ingersoll, T. N. (1995). Slave Codes and Judicial Practice in New Orleans, 1718-1807. Law and History Review, 13(1), 23-62.